SoCS: watching eggs

On the news this week, there have been several features about eggs.

Specifically, a pair of bald eagle eggs in a nest in the National Arboretum in Washington, DC.

One of them has hatched and the eaglet has enjoyed its first meal. The second is expected to hatch over the weekend.

There is a camera for people to watch a live feed of the nest:  http://www.eagles.org/dceaglecam/

The bald eagle is the national bird of the United States. It was almost killed by DDT, which bioaccumulated in the adult birds and caused its eggs to be so fragile that they could not withstand the weight of the parent when they were being incubated in the nest.

Since the banning of DDT, the population has slowly recovered. Locally, from our area in the Northeast US, we do sometimes spot bald eagles, which would have been incredibly rare twenty or thirty years ago.

Will the second egg hatch? Will both eaglets survive? We can keep a lookout via the camera and find out.
*****
Linda’s prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “egg.” Join us! Find out how here:  http://lindaghill.com/2016/03/18/the-friday-reminder-and-prompt-for-socs-march-1916/

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Author: Joanne Corey

Please come visit my eclectic blog, Top of JC's Mind. You can never be sure what you'll find!

13 thoughts on “SoCS: watching eggs”

  1. Will be watching daily. We had a Peregrine Falcon nest cam in Hartford, CT at the Travelers Tower for several years. Amelia, the female returned each year to the aerie where she had her first eggs. For some corporate reason the area where she nested was deconstructed. We can only hope that she found another location just as secure and close to a bountiful food source like the Connecticut River near the Travelers Tower.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Peregrine falcons are amazing birds, too! I’m sure Amelia’s instincts guided her to choose another safe nesting site, although one without a camera so that we could safely watch. Enjoy the eagle cam, Donna!

      Like

    1. To think we could have lost this species, at least in the lower 48. It’s definitely a sign of hope that they have come back so far. I love that this pair has chosen the National Arboretum as their nesting site.

      Liked by 1 person

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